A Look At Some Of Tomorrow’s Highlights (Thursday)

Eimear McBride and Paul Lynch 1.30pm at the Seanchai Centre

Eimear McBride
Eimear McBride

Eimear McBride’s debut novel, A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing (2013), has taken the literary world by storm, winning the inaugural Goldsmiths Prize for fiction in 2013. It was also shortlisted for the 2014 Folio Prize, and the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction 2014, and is shortlisted for the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year Award. Touching on everything from family violence to sexuality and the personal struggle to remain intact in times of intense trauma, the novel tells the story of a young woman’s relationship with her brother, and the long shadow cast by his childhood brain tumour. Born in Liverpool to Northern Irish parents, Eimear’s childhood was mostly spent in Tubbercurry, Co Sligo.

Hailed as a major new Irish talent by Sebastian Barry, Colum McCann and Daniel Woodrell, Paul Lynch is author of the critically

Paul Lynch
Paul Lynch

acclaimed Red Sky In Morning (2013), The novel takes a compassionate and sensitive look of the merciless side of man and the indifference of nature, and is both a mesmerising feat of imagination and a landmark piece of fiction. His second novel The Black Snow (2014) has been described by Donal Ryan as “containing some of the most beautiful writing I have ever read. Vivid, unsettling and intensely enjoyable.” Paul was born in Limerick, grew up in Donegal, and is now living in Dublin.

Paul and Eimear will be interviewed by author and journalist Martina Devlin.

 

Tishani Doshi 2.30pm at St John’s Theatre

Tishani Doshi
Tishani Doshi

Born in Madras, India, to Welsh-Gujarati parents, Tishani Doshi is an award-winning poet, novelist, freelance journalist, dancer and intrepid traveller. Tishani’s debut collection of poems, Countries of the Body (2006), won the prestigious Forward Prize for Best First Collection. She is also the recipient of an Eric Gregory Award, the All-India Poetry Prize for her poem The Day We Went to the Sea, and was finalist in the Outlook-Picador Non-Fiction competition for her essay, Excerpts from the Journals of a Delusional Widow.

Her first novel, The Pleasure Seekers (2010), which she describes as “a love letter to my parents,” and based on the love affair and eventual marriage of her Welsh mother and Gujarati father, was published to critical acclaim and shortlisted for the Hindu Best Fiction Award and longlisted for the Orange Prize and the Dublin IMPAC Award. She has also published a second collection of poems, Everything Begins Elsewhere(2013). Her latest book Fountainville (2013), is a fascinating reworking of a medieval Welsh myth from the Mabinogion.

Tishani will be interviewed by Jackie Goodall who is a freelance journalist and official blogger for Listowel Writers’ Week

 

Dinaw Mengetsu 5.00pm at St John’s Theatre

Born in Addis Ababa, Ethopia, Dinaw Mengestu has made his mark on the international stage as an extremely gifted writer. Drawing on his Ethiopian heritage as well as

Dinaw Mengetsu
Dinaw Mengetsu

his experience as a journalist, he has a wonderful ability to create timeless fiction about the human condition. Reminding us of our common humanity, he deals with themes such as exile, poverty, hunger and violence, showing us people confronting situations many of us are fortunate enough not to have to deal with. His first novel, Children of the Revolution (2008), won the Guardian First Book Award and the Prix de Premier Roman Étranger. His third novel, All Our Names (2014), switches back and forth between post-colonial Uganda and the American Midwest during the 1970s.  Taut and searing, it blazes with insights about the physical and emotional geographies that circumscribe our lives. Dinaw currently lives with his family in New York.

Niall MacMonagle, author and teacher, will interview Dinaw.

 

Gerbrand Bakker 8.00pm at The Arms Hotel Ballroom

Gerbrand Bakker
Gerbrand Bakker

Gerbrand Bakker was born in the little village of Wieringerwaard. He studied to become a social worker, but after one year he knew it was not for him. He studied historical linguistics in Amsterdam and worked for Dutch TV as a sub-titler. He is also a skating instructor and since 2006 a licenced landscape-gardener. He has written several novels, among which the Twin (2008), received the Dublin Literary IMPAC Award in 2010 and the Detour (2010), which was awarded the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize in 2013. the Detour has recently been shortlisted for the Dublin Literary IMPAC Award 2014. He alternatively lives in Amsterdam and Schwarzbach, a tiny village in the German Eifel, where he is working to create his own garden

Gerbrand will be interviewed by poet and novelist Tishani Doshi.

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