The Listowel Writers’ Week Irish Poem of the Year 2022 Shortlist

[vc_row full_width=”stretch_row_content” equal_height=”yes”][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”38816″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center”][modal_popup_box width=”800″ btnalign=”center” toppadding=”10″ leftpadding=”25″ btnsize=”20″ titlealign=”center” titletext=”” border=”0px solid #000000″ btnclr=”#ffffff” hoverclr=”#ffffff” btnbg=”#1dd1bf” hoverbg=”#3d9acc” btntext=”Jim McElroy” bodybg=”#d8d8d8″ caption_url=””]

BlOG:

2019: selected for Poetry Ireland Introductions, second prize at the Bridport Poetry Prize, Individual Artist Award by Arts Council NI. 2020: winner of the Francis Ledwidge Poetry Award. 2021: winner of Seamus Heaney Award for New Writing and the Poetry Business International Book and Pamphlet Competition. 2022: joint winner of Mairtín Crawford Poetry Award.

Shortlisted for the Rialto Pamphlet Award, Gutter Edwin Morgan Prize, Bridport Poetry Prize, Cúirt New Writing Prize, Gregory O’ Donoghue International Poetry Competition, runner-up in the Fingal Poetry Prize, nominated for Pushcart and Forward prizes. His award winning pamphlet, We Are The Weather, is published by Smith|Doorstop.

https://poetrybusiness.co.uk/product/we-are-the-weather/

Poem: Unmaking his chair

[/modal_popup_box][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”38817″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center”][modal_popup_box width=”800″ btnalign=”center” toppadding=”10″ leftpadding=”25″ btnsize=”20″ titlealign=”center” titletext=”” border=”0px solid #000000″ btnclr=”#ffffff” hoverclr=”#ffffff” btnbg=”#1dd1bf” hoverbg=”#3d9acc” btntext=”Martina Dalton” bodybg=”#d8d8d8″]

BlOG:

Martina Dalton lives in Tramore, County Waterford. Her poems have been published widely including Poetry Ireland Review, The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, The Stinging Fly, Crannóg, Skylight 47, Channel, The Honest Ulsterman, The Waxed Lemon, The Cormorant, The Stony Thursday Book, Washing Windows Too (Arlen House), Local Wonders, and Romance Options (both from Dedalus Press). In 2019 she was selected for the Words Ireland National Mentoring Programme. In 2021 She was shortlisted for the Julian Lennon Prize for Poetry, won third prize in the Red Line Festival Poetry Competition, and second prize in the Waterford Poetry Prize.

 Poem: Wedding dress

Scalloped leaves entrap a sprig of white

Forget-me-not.

Silk-wound stems repeat themselves

 

like vows, around a missing throat.

Hexagons of net, like they’ve been honed

by microscopic bees.

 

A circle smudged in pink,

where confetti must have caught.

Trapped forever in the past.

 

Where the bodice meets the skirt,

a row of tiny beads join hands.

Lace stretched to bursting round a heart.

 

A row of sixteen satin covered discs,

miss their counterparts, wait eagerly

to slip each lined up loop.

 

Pronovias of Barcelona, stitched in gold.

Double edged the snow white hem,

stained now, where it hit the floor.

 

The buttons at the cuff

never needing to be opened,

so small my hands had been.

 

A satin band now torn,

where I wound it tightly round my wrist

for our first dance.

 

Held up to the light, the net in pleats

forms ghostly ribs, delicate

against the plain white cotton of my bed.

 

Like it’s being lifted from a photograph

I hold it by its shoulders.

Fold it from the outside in.

 

White pencilled squiggles gather messy

on the floor. Each wrinkle of the train,

like tip of tide on sand.

 

Perfume, catches in my throat.

The overwhelming scent,

of Celebration, Love in white,

Faded rose.

Published – Irish Independent/New Irish Writing – 30th July 2022[/modal_popup_box][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”38823″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center”][modal_popup_box width=”800″ btnalign=”center” toppadding=”10″ leftpadding=”25″ btnsize=”20″ titlealign=”center” titletext=”” titlesize=”0″ border=”0px solid #000000″ btnclr=”#ffffff” hoverclr=”#ffffff” btnbg=”#1dd1bf” hoverbg=”#3d9acc” btntext=”Paul McMahon” bodybg=”#d8d8d8″]

BlOG:

From Belfast, Paul McMahon lives in Cork. His debut poetry chapbook, Bourdon, was published by Southword Editions.

Paul was awarded The Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize by Carol Ann Duffy and The Nottingham Open Poetry Prize by Neil Astley. Other poetry awards include The Moth International Poetry Prize, The Westival International Poetry Prize, The Golden Pen Poetry Prize, 2nd prize in The Basil Bunting and The Salt International Poetry Prizes, runner-up prize-winner in The Troubadour, The Tom Howard, and The Atlanta Review Poetry Prizes, and bursary awards for poetry from The Arts Councils of Ireland and N. Ireland.

Twice nominated for the forward prize, his poetry has appeared in journals such as The Poetry Review, The London Magazine, Rialto, Agenda, The Threepenny Review, The North, The Best New British and Irish Poets, Poetry Ireland Review, The Atlanta Review, The Irish Times, The Stinging Fly, and others.

Poem: WHAT MAN DOESN’T?

Driving through the outskirts of Tuxtla

I looked out the window of the night bus

and saw a man sprinting along the pavement.

Headed to the centre, like us, he must be late

for a date, I told myself, as we drove on,

leaving him behind, and when I imagined

his lady at a corner checking her phone

I could only smile – I knew the routine well,

what man doesn’t, right? I was still thinking

of him, making it up to her, a minute later

as the bus slowed down to weave through

an incident area marked out by the police

when I looked out the same window and saw

another man lying face down on the road,

legs crossed, a sheet of A4 paper covering

his head, and a pool of liquid glistening

beside the curls of his shoulder-length hair –

as the sprinter appeared, screaming, and ran

towards the dead man, I blessed myself and

noticed a policeman looking at me, nodding

his head as though he knew this routine – me

on the bus looking out while safely driving

past – only too well, what man doesn’t, right?

Published – The Poetry Review VIII, Vol 4, December 2021[/modal_popup_box][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”38818″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center”][modal_popup_box width=”800″ btnalign=”center” toppadding=”10″ leftpadding=”25″ btnsize=”20″ titlealign=”center” titletext=”” titlesize=”0″ border=”0px solid #000000″ btnclr=”#ffffff” hoverclr=”#ffffff” btnbg=”#1dd1bf” hoverbg=”#3d9acc” btntext=”Michael Longley” bodybg=”#d8d8d8″]

BlOG:

Michael Longley has received many awards, among them the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Hawthornden Prize and the Griffin International Prize. His Collected Poems was published in 2006, and Sidelines: Selected Prose in 2017. In 2001 he received the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, and in 2003 the Wilfred Owen Award. He was appointed CBE in 2010, and from 2007 to 2010 was Ireland Professor of Poetry. In 2017 he received the PEN Pinter Prize, and in 2018 the inaugural Yakamochi Medal. In 2015 he was made a Freeman of the City of Belfast, where he and his wife the critic Edna Longley live and work. In 2022 he was awarded the prestigious Feltrinelli International Poetry Prize for a lifetime’s achievement.

Poem: Amelia’s Model

In her model of the solar system

My seven-year-old cosmologist

Ties to a barbecue skewer

With fuse wire the planets, buttons:

For Venus an ivory button,

Mercury silver beside the sun,

Mother-of-pearl for Jupiter,

Red and green for Mars and Earth,

For Saturn’s rings a pipe-cleaner,

So that in the outer darkness

Close to the kitchen her brown eyes

Represent Uranus, Neptune.

II

Amelia, you didn’t include Pluto

In your wire sculpture of the solar system:

Tiny and very far away, an ice

World of ice mountains and methane snow,

A dance of five moons unlit by the sun,

The god of the afterlife’s kingdom –

We shall go there when we die, dear child

Published – The Slain Birds, September 2022[/modal_popup_box][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”50px”][vc_column_text]

The An Post Irish Book Awards 2022 shortlist have been announced!

We are absolutely delighted to announce the poetry shortlist for the Listowel Writers’ Week Irish Poem of the Year 2022, in association with An Post Irish Book Awards.

 

Many entries were received again this year for the Irish Poem of the Year 2022 competition, which were anonymously adjudicated by Ian McMillan. Ian is poet-in-residence for The Academy of Urbanism, Barnsley FC and now Barnsley’s Lockdown Poet. As well as presenting The Verb every week, he’s a regular on BBC Breakfast, Coast, Countryfile, Pointless Celebrities, Pick of the Week, Last Word and BBC Proms Plus. He’s been a castaway on Desert Island Discs. Previously, he was resident poet for English National Opera, UK Trade & Investment, Yorkshire TV’s Investigative Poet and Humberside Police’s Beat Poet. Ian has an honorary doctorate of Sheffield Hallam University, North Staffs Polytechnic, University Centre Barnsley –  Huddersfield University and was Visiting Professor at Bolton University.

Photo Credit: Jamie Bubb

 

The Shortlist

Ian McMillan had the unenviable task of choosing a shortlist of four poems from the many poetry entries that were submitted this year. The four shortlisted poems include:

Unmaking His Chair by Jim McElroy

Wedding Dress by Martina Dalton

What Man Doesn’t by Paul McMahon

Amelia’s Model by Michael Longley

 

How to vote for your poem

Voting is now open for the Listowel Writers’ Week Irish Poem of the Year. Click HERE to register your vote!

The An Post Irish Book Awards takes place on 23rd November.

The An Post Irish Book Awards on RTÉ One and RTÉ Player takes place on 7th December.

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